united_kingdom_travel100ng.comThe United Kingdom is made up of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. It is an island nation in northwestern Europe. England – birthplace of Shakespeare and The Beatles – is home to the capital, London, a globally influential centre of finance and culture. England is also site of neolithic Stonehenge, Bath’s Roman spa and centuries-old universities at Oxford and Cambridge.

London is the capital city of the United Kingdom. Covering an area of 607 square miles, it is the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom. It is located on the River Thames.

The United kingdom boasts of very rich history which reflects in the architectural designs of their castles, museums, cathedrals, abbeys and temples. A wonderful destination if you are passionate about arts and history.

TOP 5 PLACES TO VISIT IN UK

5. The London Eye

The London Eye is a giant Ferris wheel on the South Bank of the River Thames in London. From the top of the London Eye you can see things about 25 miles away. On a clear day, you can make out Windsor Castle. It is one of the highest viewing platforms in London. It takes 30 minutes to complete a revolution and doesn’t have to stop for passengers to step on and off.

4. The British Museum

The British Museum is a museum dedicated to human history, art, and culture, located in the Bloomsbury area of London. The British Museum was founded in 1753, the first national public museum in the world. From the beginning it granted free admission to all ‘studious and curious persons’. Visitor numbers have grown from around 5,000 a year in the eighteenth century to nearly 6 million today.

3. Stonehenge

Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument in Wiltshire, England, 2 miles west of Amesbury and 8 miles north of Salisbury. One of the most famous sites in the world, Stonehenge is the remains of a ring of standing stones that is between 4,000 and 5,000 years old.

2. The Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Unquestionably one of the dominating features of the London skyline, the Palace of Westminster has always been an important centre of government.

Going back to the middle ages, the land on which the current palace sits was called Thorney Island, and its location in what we know as Westminster gave it strategic value in virtually the middle of the area and along the banks of the Thames.

1. Big Ben

Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, and often extended to refer to the clock and the clock tower. The ‘Ben’ in the name is thought to be a tribute to Sir Benjamin Hall, commissioner of works for the project, who was, appropriately, a man of great size. The accuracy of the clock has been maintained by a relatively primitive method; pennies are used to adjust and balance the swing of the clock’s pendulum.